Lemon Posset Shortcakes

As you’ll recall, once a month, one of the recipes I bake goes to my friend and co-worker, Gilad.  Unfortunately, at the end of this month (so, at the end of this week!), he’ll no longer be my co-worker. 😦 I’m glad he’s not leaving the area, and I’ll still see him at least once a month through this year, though! 🙂 Anyway, I had a hard time picking what to give him this month, so I let him choose. He said he loved lemon, so this was it!

Posset shortcakes!
Posset shortcakes!

I haven’t tried these yet, though the leftover posset was delicious. Maybe he’ll let me have a taste tomorrow!

I love the chemistry of baking. I remember baking as a kid and being fascinated by being able to mix simple ingredients together and make something totally different from any of the inputs. My Mom thought she was being sneaky by using it to teach me fractions, but I think she really gave me an interest in chemistry instead.

Eggs & Sugar
Eggs & Sugar

I love watching eggs and sugar transform before my eyes into foamy goodness. It’s one of the best parts of making a génoise. Other than the eating of it, of course.

So fluffy!
So fluffy!

Once you’ve beaten the eggs & sugar into a foam, you mix a little of the foam in with the browned butter and vanilla, then fold the flour into the foam. I had to use the cake flour + cornstarch substitution because it turns out I’m out of Robin Hood “best for blending,” which is the equivalent of Wondra flour that is specified in Rose’s génoise recipes.

Flour & cornstarch mixture, beurre noisette, and egg foam
Flour & cornstarch mixture, beurre noisette, and egg foam

I use my stand mixer’s whisk attachment to fold flour into eggy foams, because it’s the ballooniest whisk I have.

Folding in the flour
Folding in the flour

Then you fold in the foam that was mixed with the butter & vanilla.

Folding in the buttery egg foam
Folding in the buttery egg foam

Pour into the shortcake pan. Don’t be like me – be careful when pouring it in, to make sure it gets nicely into the very bottom corners of the pan, so that you end up with perfectly shaped cakes.

Ready for the oven
Ready for the oven

There was a thread in our Facebook group about the price and availability of Meyer lemons. I found them at Sobeys for $4.99 for a 1 lb bag. Given that normal lemons were pretty close to the same price at, typically, about $0.99 per lemon, I didn’t think this was particularly usurious, but my baking friend from Florida said “No way” to $2.99/lb. Oh what a difference perspective makes to food prices!

$4.99 for these!
$4.99 for these!

To make posset, which is apparently a treat that goes back to medieval times, you scald cream, then, basically, curdle it with something acidic. In this case, you also add sugar.

Lemon proto-posset
Lemon proto-posset

It’s not really curdled, but it’s definitely clotted.  After it’s set up in the fridge a bit, you take the top layer of posset, which is thicker than the stuff underneath, and spread it in the crater on the cakes (which have previously been dowsed in lemon syrup and brushed with apple jelly to make sure they stay moist).

First row down
First layer down – you can see my lopsided cakes here.

After taking off the top layer, you can see that my posset is still somewhat thick.

Kinda thick?
Kinda thick?

Nevertheless, the cakes go into the fridge to set the first layer up.  Then you take them out, and spoon out enough posset to fill up the cavity in your shortcakes.

Posset shortcakes!
Posset shortcakes!

All done!  Let’s see what Gilad thinks of them. The somewhat liquidy leftover posset from the bottom of the bowl was tasty!

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9 thoughts on “Lemon Posset Shortcakes

  1. The genoise smelled like Madeleine cookies baking to me so leftover Posset with a Madeleine would be easy peasy! Although I’m buying Madeleines, not making them. I like your pan. Is it a Nordic Ware? I use the mixer whisk, too. I can’t find a really big balloon whisk and I’ve tried.

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  2. Glad you found the lemons for that good price.. over here in Tampa they were 2.69 EACH! but I made them with the regular lemon and they were just as delish. I’m sure Gilad will love them.

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  3. I forgot them at home in the fridge this morning. 😦 hopefully still good tomorrow!

    Monica, I think the sign in your picture said $2.99/lb. If they’ve mislabelled them, I’d be tempted to fight for the price on the sign. 😉

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  4. You are a very generous person I”ll tell you that , this custard like filling is a keeper…lucky its fast and easy to make, maybe treat yourself later to some…

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  5. Really good! I got half of one. He cut them into quarters and shared with his team, with one whole one to take home for later. I think the texture of the cake probably suffered from the extra day in the fridge, but I definitely enjoyed the flavours!

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  6. Hi Kristina: You are unbelievably generous! Great job on your beautiful shortcakes. I love them but they were fussy to make. Not the baking–it was all the syrup–WAIT–glaze–WAIT–make the possett–WAIT–fill the cakelettes–WAIT….I guess you can tell that I am an impatient kind of person???

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