Ricotta Loaf

I said just yesterday that I love making pies. Today, I’m saying that I love making bread. Maybe I just need to acknowledge the fact that I love baking, period. That being said, there’s not a whole lot of interesting pictures you can take of the bread making process, in my opinion. Maybe I’m just not overly creative, but with bread, you’re generally dealing with something white, something a bit off-white, something slightly brown, and some more white or clear stuff. This week, it was ricotta loaf. Something white (ricotta), mixed into some white things (flour, sugar, salt), and something brown (yeast), and something slightly off-white (butter). We go a little crazy this week, and throw in a splash of colour with something yellow (egg)!

There was some chatter about the yeast quantity in the “Bread Bible Bakers” Facebook group. Faithy questioned the 1/2 TBSP quantity, so she weighed and measured her yeast, and came up with 1/2 tsp = 5 g. So, she used 1/2 tsp, but she was disappointed with the resulting fairly dense loaf. I’m sure I went by volume for yeast, because my scale’s just not that precise with small quantities, but the volume that I remember using was 1/2 tsp. Now I look at my picture, and I see that the 500 g flour + 25 g sugar + ??? yeast = 527g. So… did I accidentally use 1/3 of what the recipe called for, for yeast, by mixing up my TBSP and TSP? Or does my yeast weigh a lot less than the US brands Rose recommends? Me accidentally using too little would explain why it took so long to rise.

Perplexed
Perplexed

Ah well, moving on… Mix the flour mixture, then add the softened butter (which got a little too soft in the microwave), ricotta cheese, egg, and salt.

Food processors are wonderful
Food processors are wonderful

I used the dough blade in the food processor for the first time to knead this dough.

Smooth but not sticky
Smooth but not sticky

Rose cautions against letting it go too long, lest the butter & cheese get too warm, resulting in a sticky dough.

Ready to rise
Ready to rise

Into the container I always use for bread dough, then after it’s doubled in size, which took 4-5 hours, shape it, proof it, and bake it. Aside from how long it took to rise & proof, I don’t think the yeast confusion did any serious harm.

Baked!
Baked!

Brush with melted butter, or just be lazy and take a pat of butter and rub the hot bread with it. As I mentioned in my last post, I had intended to take this to share with my Aunt & Uncle for Sunday dinner, but we didn’t make it to their place due to illness. Instead, while my husband rested and recovered, I did some yard work and I managed to get my next warp onto my loom.

Warp ready for weaving
Warp ready for weaving

Now I wait for the battery to recharge on the bobbin winder that Jay jury-rigged for me out of an unused power drill. 😉

Verdict on this loaf? The flavour is good, and the texture is fantastic, warm. It made a great accompaniment to butternut squash soup on Sunday night. I’ve been eating a plain slice cold for breakfast the past few days, too. The crumb is a bit odd. Not fluffy stretchy like a bread with well-developed gluten, but it seems a bit more like a quick bread in texture.

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5 thoughts on “Ricotta Loaf

  1. Hi! It’s hard to feel inspired to take pictures of white, whiter and brown things. I feel the same, and I also agreed with your final assessment of the bread. You’re right. It did taste a bit like a quick bread, rather than a yeast bread. I love seeing the picture of your loom. The color of your warp is really pretty. What are you making?

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  2. Hi Kimberlie! I’m working on a pair of tea towels at the moment. This is the third project on my own loom. Everything else I wove before that was during classes at the KW weavers and spinners guild. The first project was a pair of lap/baby blankets, then I made a set of 7 tea towels, and now this pair. I’m trying a waffle-ish weave this time. I’ll try and remember to post pictures as it progresses.

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