True Orange Génoise

I first made this cake back in the fall, to satisfy a request from the guy I buy my winemaking supplies from. Of course, I didn’t have Seville oranges, then. I wouldn’t have had Seville oranges for this version either, if Vicki of Heavenly Cake Walk hadn’t been hugely generous and sent me some all the way from California. They made the trip quite well, with only one of them starting to turn green and fuzzy, and without that one, I had about 1/4 cup of extra juice, so it worked out about perfectly.

Sevilles, from Sacramento
Sevilles, from Sacramento

When I made the cake for my friend, I used a combination of a bunch of different types of oranges, hoping the variety would make up for the lack of whatever it was that made Sevilles unique. Now I know better. There’s really nothing like these tart little guys.

For this cake, you start by heating up the eggs & sugar in a double boiler, then beating the snot out of them.

Starting to lighten in colour
Starting to lighten in colour

The mixture turns beautifully light and fluffy within a few short minutes.

So light and fluffy!
So light and fluffy!

Gently fold in your flour, and bake. I doubled the cake and tripled the curd when I made it last fall, so I could have three layers of curd rather than just one.

Beautifully risen, flat, level cakes
Beautifully risen, flat, level cakes

Last week, I also ended up doubling the cake… but not for quite such a well thought out reason. The first batch of cake I made came out so short that there was no way I was going to be able to split it in two! So, I baked a second one. This one, I let heat a bit longer, and I also beat it a bit longer than the previous one. The second one came out a whole lot better, but nowhere nearly as nice as the one I’d done previously. I really don’t know what happened. Beginner’s luck, the first time?

Denser cake on the right
Denser cake on the right
Denser cake in the back
Denser cake in the back

I ended up using both cakes instead of attempting to torte either of them. I don’t think anyone noticed other than me (and maybe hubby). I did sort of run out of ganache, but I think that was probably a good thing. The chocolate just didn’t do anything for me on this one, so the super thin layer was kind of nice. Making the ganache and the curd wasn’t too complicated, and I actually really enjoy the time spent alone at the stove waiting for the curd to “pool thickly”. I followed Rose’s recommendation and put the whole cake together on Saturday, then resisted the temptation to cut into it until Sunday. Light and moist!

Finished Cake February
Finished Cake February

For the one I made for my friend last fall, I didn’t place the oranges on until I got to their house for the party, so there are no pictures of that. 😉

Finished Cake November
Finished Cake November

I didn’t taste much of the cake I made for my friend, but I remember thinking at the time that it wasn’t quite what I expected when I read Rose’s description comparing it to an orange sour ball candy. Of course, that’s because I didn’t have the sevilles at the time, and I had just used concentrated juice from various sweet oranges. With the sevilles, this really does taste like an orange candy. I’d really like to try it with a really rich vanilla buttercream, because I think it would taste something like a creamsicle, which I absolutely love. I’ll have to keep my eye out for Sevilles, now that this is supposed to be the season.

Mmmm!
Mmmm!

As always, the cake disappeared quickly at work. Programmers are like vultures, when it comes to free food. This past weekend I made up a bunch of cupcakes to use up an accumulation of frostings in my freezer, and they were gone within 20 minutes today. Vultures, I tell you! Our buildmaster said as he was wandering away, cupcake in hand, “you should put rat poison in these one of these days”. I keep having people ask when I’m going to open a bakery, and my answer’s always the same: “As soon as I can afford to.” 😉

That reminds me, I’ve been meaning to post my response to the thread “Why real baking?” that I noticed on the forums at Rose’s website. My mother taught me and my sister fractions through baking, at a very young age. She had a degree in home ec, and was a math teacher for a time before I came along. It’s always been a dream of mine to bake for a living. I think my mother tried her hardest to squash that dream, along with the dream of being a hairdresser (not sure what I was thinking there), by making me do all of the baking in the house, as well as having to cut her hair regularly. In grade 7 (age 12), I did a science fair project on honey versus sugar as sweeteners in cookies. My next year’s project was on different leavening agents. For a while there, I figured I was going to become a food scientist. (Un?)fortunately, I took a computer programming course in high school and got hooked on that instead. I think my mother was quite relieved. My Dad’s a civil engineering professor, and my sister’s ‘known’ she was going to be a “CivE” since she was about 4, so Mom had big hopes for me, too. 🙂 She did manage to rid me of my ridiculous career choice of hairdresser, but I still harbour a not-so-secret desire to have a bakery someday. Maybe a bakery/tea shop.

Advertisements

17 thoughts on “True Orange Génoise

  1. Your sponge cakes both look perfect! Your cake look great! Wow! Impression science fair project at age 12! All parents have high hopes for their kids isn’t it? ..me included..:p

    Like

  2. That cake sure looks fantastic, the slice on the picture looks very inviting.
    great job!!
    Honey vs. sugar, hmmm!! that sounds like a good proposal for my son’s first science project, since I get to have fun participating in it too:)

    Like

  3. They both look beautiful! I like the idea of a cream sicle cake….would you use white chocolate ganache? Please post as soon as you make it! And make me a reservation in that tea room when it opens!

    Like

  4. I seem to be going from one HCB blog to another saying “wow, what a tall cake!” However, wow, what a tall cake your first one was. If you figure out what made the difference, please let me know–I’m still trying to get one over an inch and a half or so.

    Like

  5. Vicki: I’ll definitely save you a seat. For the creamsicle, I was thinking of the white chocolate custard+ butter combination (before adding the lemon curd) from Woody’s Lemon Luxury cake. I don’t know if Rose has that combination listed on its own somewhere, but as far as I was concerned, it was fantastic. That or just a vanilla bean buttercream. I’ll definitely let you all know if/when I make it.

    As for the tall cake, when I made it back in the fall, I honestly don’t think the flour was 100% incorporated, because I was too worried about overmixing and deflating it. I remember picking a couple of small clumps of uncooked flour out of the cake when I torted it… so while it may have been pretty, I don’t think it was quite right.

    Just wanted to add that I didn’t mean to give the impression that Mom was trying to stomp all over my dreams. She really did (and still does) want the best for me, and I definitely appreciate her having encouraged me to expand my childhood notions of ‘dream job’. I really do enjoy the work that I do, and if I didn’t have the sort of brain that liked logic and precision, I wouldn’t have clicked with that course I took in high school. I also really enjoy the look on any random co-worker’s face when I tell him (it’s mostly “him”s that I work with) that I have cake in my cubicle, when he’s in the middle of a hard problem.

    (I recently had a good conversation with a guy I sat next to in that computer course in high school, at my 10 year high school reunion. We used to compete over who could finish the most programming problems the quickest. I usually won. He now works for Microsoft.)

    Like

  6. First, your cake looks awesome. I like the swirls on top of the cake. The color of the curd looks great too. Second, how cool that you’re a programmer. I’m a SW engineer, doing C# in .Net 3.5. You?

    Like

  7. Your cake is super tall!

    I also love bringing sweets to work. Although I don’t take it as a compliment when they disappear. We recently got a box of really dry, strange-tasting cookies from a client and even though everyone agreed they were awful. They were gone in a couple days (it might actually have been a record for length of time food has lasted at the clinic!). 🙂

    Like

  8. Go you for making two genoise. I agree completely with you about the ganache – I think it is one of those love/hate things.

    I loved that your Mum taught you fractions via baking. Win win!

    I have similar daydreams about a little cafe, great cakes, excellent coffee somewhere in the sun. But not sure I would have the necessary stamina to take it past the daydream and into the 7 days a week slog.

    Like

  9. Hanaa, I mostly do Java, though I picked up some C# last year when working on an integration with Visual Studio for my employer‘s product. We do SCM (Software Configuration Management) and ALM (Application Lifecycle Management) and various other TLAs (three-letter acronyms). At its simplest, we make a product that will version your source code and track your bugs, but it really can handle a whole lot more than that. I’ve mostly been working on IDE integrations since I started here. Right now, it’s Eclipse.

    Like

  10. That sounds cool. Is the tool built specifically for Java developers? We use Microsoft’s TFS (Team Foundation Server) for source code control/versioning, bugtracking, and CI (Continuous Integration). Our SCM team is mainly responsible for the CI part. I use Visual Studio but I know people who use Eclipse (and some who have used Eclipse in the past) and they seem to like it. I can’t wait for VS2010 though. So many cool features :o) I got a preview at DevConnections in Vegas late last year!

    Like

  11. Our product can be used for any programming language, and some of our customers don’t even use it for their source code control, but use it for everything else in their development process — requirements, tech specs, defect tracking, build management, test, etc. A large number of our customers do embedded systems for things like car parts, mobile devices or ATMs. Microsoft’s TFS is definitely a competitor of ours. 😉

    One of my colleagues has been responsible for testing with VS2010 — so far so good, but who knows what they’ll change that will break our integration with VS between now and official release!

    (Sorry to the rest of you for geeking out. :D)

    Like

  12. I figured Microsoft’s TFS would be a competitor of yours 😉 We use MS SharePoint for requirements. Not ideal but it’s OK. Years ago I used to work on embedded systems using Windows CE. Pretty cool stuff. Unfortunately that company shut down. I think I’d better stop before I start chasing visitors away (they’ll think they hit the wrong blog) :o)

    Like

  13. I love reading your posts Kristina… so funny. Your cake turned out wonderfully!

    I’m not a fan of chocolate and orange together, but your creamsicle idea sounds great!

    🙂
    ButterYum

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s